Yemen and Libya

Submitted by admin on Thu, 10/20/2016 - 00:39
Aimen Ajhani/El Bohly (Photo OMCT)
Aimen Ajhani/El Bohly (Photo OMCT)

 

Dear Friends,

The focus of attention in West Asia is on the Iraqi (and allied) assault on Mosul (Iraq) as well as the Syrian (and allied) assault on East Aleppo. Here are focused the eyes of the world, as it were. An 11 hour ceasefire is in effect in Aleppo, to allow aid and relief to get through the frontlines. The assault on Mosul is ongoing. It appears that ISIS has either formed a citadel in sections of the interior of Mosul or has done what it did in other major fights - disappeared into rural areas to regroup again elsewhere.

Less attention is on

Refugees, Portugal's Left & Death of the Nation

Submitted by admin on Fri, 10/14/2016 - 09:47
Chika Aniakor, The Elders, 1967
Chika Aniakor, The Elders, 1967

 

Dear Friends,

On October 13, the UN General Assembly - by acclamation - elected the former Portuguese Prime Minister and former head of the UN Refugees Agency Antonio Guterres as the next Secretary General. Guterres has a difficult job ahead of him. The refugee crisis, which he knows a great deal about, shows no sign of abating. The core issues that drive this crisis - war and poverty - are not really on the agenda. Keep in mind that the five permanent members of the UN Security Council - the United States, Russia, China, France and the United Kingdom - are

The "War on Terror," 15 Years Later

Description

Public Lecture – Vijay Prashad

October 11, 2016
7:00 pm

Balch Auditorium 
Scripps College

The Global War on Terror from the Standpoint of its Victims

Seen from a village in Waziristan, in the upper reaches of Pakistan, the Global War on Terror (GWOT) appears quite differently than it does in the anti-septic briefing rooms at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia. It is to understand the GWOT from that vantage that I decided to report – as widely as possible – from the villages that are in the gun-sights of the drone operators. This talk will travel through the landscape of the GWOT,

Colombia, Afghanistan

Submitted by admin on Thu, 10/06/2016 - 02:25
Street art in Bogota
Street art in Bogota

 

Dear Friends,

The referendum in Colombia on the peace deal failed by a very narrow margin. My report - derivative of the mood in the country - appeared yesterday in The Hindu. The takeaway is in the last paragraph,

  • Gloom prevails across the country. If the vote had gone the other way, Colombia might have shown the world that even intractable civil wars can come to an end. It would have been a message to Syria and to the Congo, a message of the power of negotiation towards a new civic compact. But this did not come to pass. Even as President Santos and the FARC

Western Bombs, Eastern Societies: The Destruction of Nations and Responsibility to Protect (R2P)

Description

The Penn State School of International Affairs

Lewis Katz Building
University Park, PA 16802
Telephone: (814) 863-0788 

 

After the fiasco of the Iraq War of 2003, the West pushed for a new mandate through the UN called the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) in 2005. This new mandate revived ideas of humanitarian intervention that had been called into question from the detritus of Iraq. No lessons were learned. After R2P came Libya, a society now in ruins, and then came Syria, a country whose civil war had been fanned along even as no good outcome seemed on the horizon. This talk by Vijay

Colombian Peace, American Elections

Submitted by admin on Thu, 09/29/2016 - 05:22
FARC (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia)

 

Dear Friends,

Good news out of Cartagena, Colombia, where the FARC and the State signed a peace deal ending a 52 year civil war. But matters are still on the edge. This Sunday, on 2 October, the people of Colombia will go to the polls to vote on a referendum towards peace. A lot rests on this vote. It will be a dangerous situation if the vote goes against peace, although the mood suggests that peace is inevitable.

My report in Alternet is on the peace deal, between the signature and the referendum. The last paragraph is here:

  • October 2nd is Gandhi’s birthday. It is a fitting day for the

Wars, Refugees, Fascism in India

Submitted by admin on Wed, 09/21/2016 - 04:59
'I Dream of…' Za’atari Syrian Refugee Camp, Jordan 2014 (Photo UNHCR)
'I Dream of…' Za’atari Syrian Refugee Camp, Jordan 2014 (Photo UNHCR)

 

Dear Friends,

The picture above, from 2014, is from Za'atari refugee camp in Jordan. It is now about the eighth or ninth largest city in Jordan - estimates for the population sit at around 80,000. It is hard to know the exact number.

In today's Alternet, I have a short report that draws from a series of UNICEF reports on the situation of child refugees. Currently, children comprise almost half the world's refugee population. UNICEF says that there are about 50 million children who are in the status of refugee. My report

Syria, NAM and Israel

Submitted by admin on Thu, 09/15/2016 - 01:23
'Bleeding Syria' by Tammam Azzam
'Bleeding Syria' by Tammam Azzam

 

Dear Friends,

Forgive me for coming to you with so much to read. But so be it. Too many things happening in the world; too much to cover.

Syria.

The ceasefire in Syria is now slated to be extended for another forty-eight hours. Each time it is extended that is a relief for the people who are trapped by this war. No such ceasefire is in place for Yemen, which was bombed on Eid by Saudi war planes. Nonetheless, for Syria this is a brief respite. Aid is not able to get to besieged places as it should - according to the UN.

Just before the ceasefire deal was

Legacies of the Tricontinental: Imperialism, Resistance, Law

Description

International Colloquium

September 22 to 24, 2016

 

Room 1, CES-Coimbra

Centre for Social Studies, University of Coimbra

Praça Dom Dinis, 3020 Coimbra, Portugal

 

 

AUDITORIO DA REITORIA  Saturday, 24th September 2016, 17:00 - 18:30

Closing Plenary: Remembering the Tricontinental and Anti-Imperial Struggle

Vijay Prashad 

 

India's historic strike, Extract from Death of the Nation, LeftWord Blog

Submitted by admin on Thu, 09/08/2016 - 01:46

 

Dear Friends,

(1) Strike.

Last week, as many as 180 million Indian workers went out on strike. It was - by all indications - the largest strike in recorded history. Unsurprisingly, media reports of the strike have been anemic. There is a grudging recognition that this happened, but only to suggest either inconvenience or futility. There was little attempt to understand the essence of this strike and what this means for Indian politics.

In Alternet this week, my column addresses this strike. The last paragraph reads,

  • What the strike says is that India’s workers