Libyan crisis

Libya & Indian America

Submitted by admin on Thu, 03/23/2017 - 02:53

 

 

Dear Friends,

An attack near the Parliament of the United Kingdom during which a terrorist killed four people comes at the same time as US jets bomb a school in the village of al-Mansoura, near Raqqa, killing thirty-three civilians. None of these are more important than the other. Both are horrendous. They should give us pause.

Our days are hallucinations, with violence always at the edge of consciousness.

The first story I share with you this week is from Libya - a country torn into shreds by NATO's 2011 war. Tripoli has been gasping for air over the pas

Algiers Diary, Wars of Destruction and Communist Histories

Submitted by admin on Wed, 01/04/2017 - 23:43

 

Algiers Diary

 

Dear Friends,

Above, a picture from the Casbah of Algiers, with children running playfully down some steps, chasing each other. They are a long way away from the French colonial period and from the 'Black Decade' of the 1990s, and yet around them linger not only the signs of those periods but also their structural residues.

In Frontline this week I have a diary on my wanderings through Algiers and my wonderings about Algerian history. The key moment that focused my thoughts was a chance encounter with a young boy named Akram. I asked him a benign question, which could not remain at the

Israel & Libya

Submitted by admin on Wed, 12/28/2016 - 21:48

 

Abdul Rahman Katanani

 

Dear Friends,

As the year ends, and as the Palestine-Israel 'peace process' lays dormant, the United Nations Security Council voted to sanction Israel for its illegal settlement policy in the Occupied Palestinian Territory. What was most significant about this vote was that the United States chose not to veto the resolution; instead it abstained.

US Secretary of State John Kerry, in a long speech, delivered the most obvious verdict for the situation on the ground - namely that if Israel rejects a two-state solution, then the only alternatives are permanent occupation or a democratic,

Libya

Submitted by Vijay Prashad on Fri, 12/23/2016 - 09:48

 

Pro Gaddafi, Green Movement

 

<Libya> Today, an Afriqiyah Airlines flight from Libya's southwest town of Sebha bound for Tripoli was hijacked to Malta. The hijackers are still holding the plane and crew, but have released the passengers. The hijacker claims to be a pro-Qaddafi militant. Sebha, in Libya's southwest, is the crossroads of the Sahara in that part of Fezzan. It is where one can see Toyota trucks carrying smuggled goods, including guns, across northern Africa as well as people who are being smuggled from western Africa to Europe. Qaddafi's ally - Khuwaildi Al-Hamidi - told me in Cairo a few years ago (bef

Libya and Fidel

Submitted by admin on Thu, 12/08/2016 - 00:16

 

Libya Is Spiraling into Bloodshed and Disaster

 

Dear Friends,

When Genghis Khan rode across Eurasia, he announced - 'All cities must be razed'. The Mongols preferred the open land. They hated cities. So did the ancient Vedic people - Indra's other name was Purandara, the destroyer of cities.

This week the battles over Aleppo (Syria) and Sirte (Libya) are substantially over. But in taking these cities, they have also been razed. So too was Kobané (Syria) and so will be Mosul (Iraq).

My column this week at Alternet is on Libya, where not only has Sirte been taken from ISIS, but ISIS has slipped the net and spread across the vast Liby

R2P

Submitted by Vijay Prashad on Tue, 11/15/2016 - 04:58

 

 

<R2P> A month ago, I visited Penn State, thanks to Sophia McClennen. The topic on the table was the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) doctrine, which was the fig leaf for the West's attempt to give ideological cover for its wars after the Iraq debacle. The talk goes over the terrain of R2P, but falls heavily on Libya and Syria. You can listen to the talk here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1MiYazFZYpI.

Before the talk, I spoke to two very smart undergraduate students, who had read my book - The Death of the Nation and the Future of the Arab Revolution - a

Syria, Libya and the US Presidential Election

Submitted by admin on Fri, 10/28/2016 - 00:52

 

Trump-Clinton
Photo Lesley Clark

 

Dear Friends,

The US presidential season is almost over - it is like the end of a mini-series, a television show that has run out of steam. November 8 is the final episode. What comes next is anyone's guess? Wikileaks' surprises from John Podesta's emails about Hillary Clinton come at a furious pace, but so too do erratic things from Donald Trump. It is a mess. My most recent Frontline report is out this week, and it is on the death knell of this campaign. The report ends, like all such bluster, with a whimper, saying that Hillary Clinton 'is a reliable candidate. Ther

Yemen and Libya

Submitted by admin on Wed, 10/19/2016 - 20:39

 

Mural on Al Saidi Street in Tripoli
Aimen Ajhani a.k.a. El Bohly

 

Dear Friends,

The focus of attention in West Asia is on the Iraqi (and allied) assault on Mosul (Iraq) as well as the Syrian (and allied) assault on East Aleppo. Here are focused the eyes of the world, as it were. An 11 hour ceasefire is in effect in Aleppo, to allow aid and relief to get through the frontlines. The assault on Mosul is ongoing. It appears that ISIS has either formed a citadel in sections of the interior of Mosul or has done what it did in other major fights - disappeared into rural areas to regroup again elsewhere.

Less attention is on Yemen,

Libya and America

Submitted by admin on Wed, 08/03/2016 - 15:50

 

'STOP PRETENDING EVERYTHING IS OKAY' at DNC2016
Photo Twitter

 

Dear Friends,

This week, the United States government began to bomb targets in the Libyan city of Sirte. Commentary on this bombardment has not taken in hand the brittleness of Libyan politics and its overwhelming complexity. My report this week for Alternet tries to provide some of the background to the grave difficulties inside Libya, most of it provoked by the 2011 NATO war on the country. Furthermore, it looks to me that these strikes will create more instability not only in Libya but also in Tunisia. The final paragraph of my report reads,

  • Will the airstrikes actually